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...interesting thought...though would we ever have found shakespeare if their works were infinite, rather than finite?...when the 200 million things we can read become 2000 billion do we gain in that mass of universe, or do we instead become ever more extraterrestrial?...

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I love the sentiment. And even if Shakespeare were not just one person but the consortium of a few geniuses, the point still remains— may even be stronger—the society of humanity is irreplaceable, inimitable. Shakespeare is not meant to be merely read, but shared, acted! Nothing can replace true dialogue and storytelling and shared life between people, no matter how aesthetically appealing a work by a computer may seem. At bottom, there’s no true lived experience there. Art is meant to be enjoyed in community

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The Infinite within. What a powerful concept. The endlessness of the realm of possibilities. It exists within each and every one of us. And yet, how accessible is it? What will trigger accessibility? If and once accessed, how will the retrieval of what's inside take place, if at all? As always, you make me think, Taylor. Thank you.

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Reading Hamlet as an adult has been a different experience than when in high school. Now I appreciate fine art and never knew that I would one day come to love Shakespeare and appreciate the genius behind his work, and it is precisely because its Shakespeare that I enjoy reading it. Reading the work of flesh and blood will always be superior to that of a computer because, with flesh and blood, there is a sort of reliability. Thank you for sharing and grinding my mind in thought in the process.

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Really enjoy the idea of the "infinite within." I also think about the "finite within." The fiction/poetry AI spits out falls flat because it is plugged into everything. It knows all references, can pull from all pots. Us humans know little. The fiction that grabs me is steeped in unknowing, some mortal trying to make sense of their infinity through their incomplete lense. This is why I'm not worried about AI fiction....yet.

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Shakespeare’s “childhood bedroom”? You would benefit from reading Elizabeth Winkler’s recent book.

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